IN THE WORKS…

Today is a day that makes me feel as though Spring is right around the corner. Unfortunately, come tomorrow, temps are going to drop again, but a girl can dream can’t she?!

With a studio that lacks heat, and the lack of a garage or basement, I have to take advantage of days like today (paint doesn’t work too well in temps less than 45 degrees!). With that said, I hope to finish at least one of these projects I have in the works…

Cane Back Chair UnfinishedCane Back Chair Partial

Set of 4 cane back chairs needing a new paint job and reupholstering.

Game Table

A game table.

Vintage Mirror

A lovely vintage mirror.

Console Table

And a soon-to-be fabulous console table!

The chairs I will actually be keeping for myself, but once finished, the rest of the pieces will be on sale at Greenwood Antiques!

First come, first serve ya’ll! Smile

GREENWOOD ANTIQUES, BUSINESS CARDS, AND A SHAMELESS PLUG.

Aye yi yi! I fell off the blogging bandwagon for a bit, but have actually been a busy bee in my silence and have much to share with you!

First, I’ve been in the process of updating my very own space at Greenwood Antiques and have been quite the painting machine! Walls, furniture…..nothing is safe from my paintbrush these days. Here is a quick evolution of my space since Feb. 1 (forgive the quality of the photos – most were taken with my phone!):

Greenwood Space Before

This is the space before I moved in. There are definitely some cute pieces, but I was ready to shake things up a bit and add a little pizzazz….

Greenwood Space 1

The space was a bit of a mess at this point, but I was in the process of moving in! I started by painting the wall, which somehow took far longer than intended. Painting straight lines is not an easy feat! And while I still need to paint one more stripe on the wall, I think it adds a fun pop of color, yes? The drum table, turquoise mirror, and cola cooler that you see in the pic quickly sold so I immediately had to reorganize…

Greenwood Space 2 copy

I think the hardest part about this job is having to sell pieces that I absolutely LOVE. Frankly, everything that I have in my space I have either had or would have in my own home – and they are not easy to part with! That perfectly rusted industrial arrow, for example, was love at first sight and when it sold, I cried a little on the inside. And that obelisk topiary that you see behind the pink chair, oh my! This was a piece that I immediately brought to the store because I knew if I brought it to my home, it would never leave. I cringed the moment it sold. *sigh* But in the end, I suppose this is not a bad problem to have!

Greenwood Space 3

This is what my space looks like now (that fan is another piece that I had a hard time parting with!). And I’ve got a few more pieces in the works that I’ll be sharing with you later in the week!

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Next, thanks to Natasha from My Cute Lobster, I’m excited to finally have business cards!

BusinessCard_Front

BusinessCard_Back

I know, a long time coming. And for just a little shameless self promotion, if you are within the Charlottesville area and want to add that extra oomph to a piece of furniture or require some added inspiration for your party planning, feel free to contact me!

A FARM TABLE + CHIPPY WOOD PANELS = A VERY HAPPY WIFE!

Ack! I was having a few computer/internet issues yesterday and quickly gave up on writing a post before I tore all of my hair out. But for today, my laptop is back up and running – I pray to the computer gods that it lasts just a little while longer!

So, over the weekend my husband and I drove out to the quaint town of Orange, about 30 minutes outside of Charlottesville, to pick up a farm table that I had found on Craigslist. And let me tell you my friends, it was a steal! Unfortunately, I don’t have photos as it is currently in pieces in the back of my husband’s car, but I can’t wait to put a paintbrush to it.

Currently, the table looks a little something like this:

Pinned Image

I’m not quite sure on what look to go for, however, and would love some input! Here are a few options:

Pinned Image

Natural wood top and distressed grey base.

Pinned Image

Shabby chic white.

https://i1.wp.com/media-cache-lt0.pinterest.com/upload/334814553517182990_buDHPPfV.jpg

Stained top, white base.

Pinned Image

Or stained top, and base with a nice pop o’ color!

I’d love to take a vote and hear your thoughts!

While in Orange, my husband and I also stopped by an architectural salvage shop called Salvage Wrights and let me tell you, if you’re ever in the area, I highly recommend stopping by! It was  like stepping foot into a little piece of heaven. Weathered wood, chippy paint, shabby shutters, old barn doors, oh my! And the prices are really quite reasonable.

In the midst of looking for a barn door to replace our bathroom door with, I came across some fabulously chippy wood that had come from a patio ceiling of a 1910 farmhouse (and here is an interesting fact: did you know that patio ceilings are often painted sky blue to prevent wasps from nesting? Apparently, the wasps actually believe it to be the sky and will nest elsewhere. I may have to give this a try!). Each panel was 7’ long and there were dozens of them. And at $.50 per linear foot, I couldn’t say no! So I piled 10 boards on top of the farm table and went home a very happy wife.

The very next day, in our excitement, my husband and I threw together a frame fashioned from two of the chippy panels. Here’s a little sneak peak:

Chippy Chalkboard Peek

This guy will soon become a perfectly chippy chalkboard (and will be for sale in my Greenwood retail space) – tutorial coming Thursday!

DIY THURSDAY: ANTIQUED EMERALD SIDE TABLE…

Well, I’m obviously a little late in the game today. After my post on the 2013 color of the year, I felt inspired to add a little emerald to my own life and had the perfect piece to begin my experiment. Unfortunately, that piece took a bit more sanding, filling, and gluing than initially expected! I’ve spent the last day and a half refurbishing a piece that should have taken no more than a few hours. But it was fun, nevertheless, and kept me entertained far into the night last night.

Side Table Unfinished

You can see how beat up the table was!

A large chunk of the laminate was peeling off, so I tore the whole thing off and power sanded the top:

Side Table Sanded

I then used a quarter of a bottle of wood glue and almost an entire bottle of wood filler fixing and filling miscellaneous cracks and holes! Once the glue and filler were fully dry, I wiped down the entire piece and finally began painting the base layer in Annie Sloan’s Graphite

Side Table Graphite

(It was getting dark and cold outside so I had to lug the table into the warmth of my home for the paint to dry!)

With the base coat on and without any sanding between coats, I began applying Valspar’s Green Suede…

Side Table Green Suede

Emerald loveliness!

A single coat of the Green Suede over the Graphite actually looked fabulous – something I’ll keep in mind for the next project! – but I had a different vision with this piece so I applied a second coat, allowed it to fully dry, lightly distressed with 180-grit sandpaper, and then started applying the wax.

First, I used a small amount of Miss Mustard Seed’s furniture wax (just my preference these days, but any clear wax will do!), allowed it to sit for about 3 minutes, and then applied Annie Sloan’s dark wax. As usual, I always work in small sections using the dark wax, brushing on, and then buffing off with another coat of clear wax.

After the table was fully waxed and buffed, I decided to add in a little gold (you can’t go wrong with emerald and gold!) so I spray painted the drawer pull and also added a bit of gold paint detail…

Side Table Macro

And voila!

Side Table Complete

Side Table Macro 2

I love its style and the pop of color it brings. And as much as I’d love to keep it for myself…I have no more space in my house for miscellaneous furniture pieces! So come January, this little gem (get it??) will be in my space out in Greenwood.

LINKED TO:

HookingupwithHoHKatie's Nesting Spotshabby creek cottageMade in a DayFurniture Feature FridaysFrench Country CottageCast Party Wednesday

A SNEAK PEEK, AND MORE SHARING OF THE LOVE…

First, I want to give you an itty bitty sneak peak into a living room update that is currently in the works…

Pier 1 Basket

I’m actually not a huge fan of Pier 1 these days, but while browsing for a new throw blanket, I stumbled across this adorable basket and just had to snatch it up as a replacement to my decade old Ikea magazine holder. Seriously, it was about time…and I love it!

I also snagged a furniture piece at Charlottesville’s premier vintage/antique store, Circa, that I am refinishing. If you’re ever out and about here in good ole C-Ville, this is a highly recommended stop. It’s almost impossible to leave without a handful of goodies!

And finally….remember this guy?

Living Room TV

The dreaded Big Black Box!

While I haven’t yet managed to convince my husband to toss the entertainment unit out the window, I have convinced him to let me refinish it – one must pick their battles, I suppose, and this was the compromise.

I hope to have the living room updated by the end of this weekend. And starting this evening, I will also be repainting my kitchen so I have a busy few days ahead of me! I can’t wait to share the updates with you next week.

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Now on to sharing of the love because really, I have so much to share!

1. I’ve been a fan of City Farmhouse for quite some time. Jennifer’s style is impeccable and her home is full of vintage charm and classic style. It’s refreshing, comfortable, and livable, which is what I find to be most important.

I also happen to be in love with these refinished chairs. You can find the tutorial here!

(Thanks Jennifer, for the sweet comment and friendly advice!)

2. Ever hear “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure?” Well, you’ll find that Jessica over at Dear Emmeline is a trash pickin’ machine! And indeed, she turns trash into treasures. Her most recent transformation is absolutely lovely – I love the gold gild she applied to the details:

Here are a few other examples of her work:

Painted with her very own chalk paint recipe!

(Thanks Jessica, for all of the amazing comments and encouragement you’ve left for me!).

3. Susan over at Uniquely Yours or Mine is another fellow trash picker and has quite a few amazing furniture for sale as we speak (and at exceptional prices)!

$225

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$185

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Want to see more? Go to her “for sale” page here or find her at the Ashland Vintage Holiday Market!

(Good luck Susan!)

Have a great weekend ya’ll!

DIY THURSDAY: MILK PAINTED DESK.

I’ve been waiting with bated breath for Miss Mustard Seed’s Milk Paint to arrive (via Red Posie) and the big moment finally arrived yesterday afternoon. It was a bit like Christmas morning opening the box and a shiver of excitement came over me as I peered down at my powdered paint. I couldn’t wait to use it!

Unfortunately, it was already late in the day and since I was only 85% recovered from the bug I had caught earlier in the week, I decided to give it one more day….but come this morning, I popped out of bed and went straight to work (well, after a cup o’ joe or two, of course).

Now, I’ve been saving a particular piece for this paint – a piece small enough to finish quickly and cheap enough that if I screwed it up, I wouldn’t be heartbroken.

Student Desk Unfinished

A cute little student desk!

I’m embarrassed to say, but this piece has actually been sitting in my kitchen – sort of as a kitchen island – for almost a year while I’ve been (very patiently) waiting to repaint and lightly renovate the walls and pantry. Hey, desperate times call for desperate measures! Needless to say, when I got wind of the MMS line of paint, this was the first piece that came to mind.

So, with the powdered form of milk paint in hand, I happily began the  transformation.

Before I get into the details of the project, however, I must give you a pre-painting tip that is particularly useful if you’ve never used milk paint before: I would highly, HIGHLY recommend watching the MMS milk paint tutorials! In my excitement to use the milk paint, I decided to forgo this and immediately regretted this decision when mixing the paint. Frankly, I had no idea what it was supposed to look like, what consistency it was supposed to be, etc. It is very different than your typical latex, acrylic, or chalk paint!

With this said, I added just a little more water that I should have and ended up with what I like to call “skim” milk paint rather than what should have been “whole” milk paint. Hence, when applying the paint, it was a bit runny.

I went with it, nevertheless, and after sanding the top of the desk to its original grain (which took a heck of a lot of sanding!), I painted the base with the first coat of my runny milk paint in Ironstone

Student Desk Half Finished

You can’t quite tell from the above picture, but when the milk paint begins to dry, you can see areas in which the paint doesn’t fully adhere and actually begins to chip. If this is an affect you’d rather avoid then make sure you mix the bonding agent in with the paint mixture! I happen to love the chippy affect, so I left the mixture as is.

I allowed the paint to dry for approximately 30 minutes then took a putty knife to very lightly remove the chipping pieces. I then added a second coat of milk paint and repeated the process. Once I achieve my desired “chippy” look, I added one coat of MMS clear wax to seal the paint and give the piece a nice, natural sheen. Finally, I brushed on a coat of Danish Oil in medium walnut…Student Desk Almost Complete

One coat of Danish Oil down, which you can see is still a little wet.

…allowed it to dry for 30 minutes before applying a second coat, and voila! After allowing the second coat to dry for another 15 minutes and wiping the whole piece down with a cloth, it looked like this:

Student Desk Finished

Student Desk Finished 2

Did I mention that we’ll be repainting soon?! As you can see, it’s much needed!

Student Desk Macro

I actually love how it turned out (I’m still working on my photography so the piece looks a bit better in person…) and particularly love the chippiness of it, but it’s definitely important to be aware of how milk paint works before applying it! What do you think?

LINKED TO:

homeworkPhotobucketFurniture Feature Fridays

DIY THURSDAY: THE PERFECT LITTLE SEWING TABLE THAT ISN’T USED FOR SEWING….

I’ve confessed on multiple occasions that I simply cannot sew. I haven’t tried that hard, really, but it’s something that I tend to avoid for no reason at all, other than the fact that I think I’ll be bad at it. I don’t even know why I think I’ll be bad at it – it’s just one of those weird, quirky feelings that I get. Do you ever feel that way?

Anyhow, I came across this hideously adorable sewing table at a price that I couldn’t refuse, quickly snatched it up, and immediately began sanding down the dreadful mahogany stain job and the goopy, glossy overabundance of polyurethane…

Sewing Table Unfinished

No, this table would definitely not be used for sewing, but I did have an idea brewing in my head, inspired by a furniture piece I had seen via Miss Mustard Seed’s Pinterest board: (apparently originating from www.fadedplains.com)

Perfect for sewing table I'm working on - could look good as bedroom night stand?

So I sanded, and sanded, and sanded some more, filling in a few holes and repairing a few cracks along the way, and then finally began painting the drawers with my beloved Annie Sloan chalk paint in “Old White.” After a couple coats of white, I began hand distressing with 180-grit sandpaper, and then sealed the painted portion with Annie Sloan’s clear wax.

For the top, I stained it with a mixture of Minwax stain, which admittedly, I haven’t quite completed yet  – I still need to get to my desired color. Once I have actually gotten to the desired color, I will seal the stained top with a very light layer of polyurethane.

Here’s the current state it’s in…

Sewing Table

Sewing Table Close

I’d actually like to darken the stain just a little, and as mentioned, I still need to give it a nice sheen with the polyurethane, but I think it turned out pretty cute! I’m also in the process of finding that perfect vintage table lamp, similar to the one in the inspirational photo but with just a little more patina.

The shelving you see above the sewing table are actually sewing drawers that I found for $7. I simply tacked in a couple D-rings on the backside of each drawer and viola! Quick and easy shelving.

ps…don’t you just HATE the enormous headboard that seems to overwhelm the picture above? I’m still trying to convince my husband that paint is the answer to this eye-sore. Yes, I think a little bit of paint and a plush down comforter would do the trick nicely….(perhaps a few reader comments expressing the same will help me convince the man to let me take a paint brush to it!).

LINKED TO:
shabby creek cottagePhotobucketKatie's Nesting Spot

Furniture Feature FridaysMade in a Day

DIY THURSDAY: MIRROR, MIRROR, ON THE WALL…

Call me vein, but I love mirrors. They can add light and depth to any room; they can be an architectural element, an intricate detail, or a bold surprise. So when I come across large, framed mirrors on my pickin’ trips (for a good price, of course), I immediately snatch them up.

Take this guy, for example…

Gold Mirror

I came across this mirror while at a junk store out in Richmond, VA, and I couldn’t resist the amazing detail – but the color was this gaudy, spray-painted gold that hid those intricate details. So in my typical DIY fashion, I broke out my paint brush, a can of Old White Annie Sloan Chalk Paint, some sandpaper, and Annie Sloan’s clear AND dark wax.

When working with details like this, the dark wax works wonders – truly! It gives the piece that aged, antique look while really making every little detail pop with that perfect patina.

So after painting the piece entirely white (two coats), I hand distressed it with 180-grit sandpaper, waxed the piece first with the clear wax, buffed it, and then added the dark wax (*unless you want to attempt to use the dark wax as a stain, ALWAYS wax the piece with clear or natural wax before using the dark wax). When using dark wax, you really want to get it deep into the grooves and details – don’t be shy!

Gold Mirror Waxed

Typically, it’s best to work in sections, dark wax on, clear wax off, allowing the dark wax to stay in the nicks and grooves, but waxing/buffing the majority off with the clear wax, leaving only a tinted patina behind. See how the details really begin to pop?!

After rubbing in the dark wax, and buffing off with the clear wax, I ended up with this…

Large Mirror Styled

Large Mirror Macro

Not too shabby, eh?

Any mirror can be painted, and with just a little TLC, you can change the whole dynamic of a room. A few more examples:

Tuscan Mirror

BEFORE: I’m just starting to paint the piece in Annie Sloan’s Paris Grey.

Tuscan Mirror After

AFTER: Hand distressed and with a hint of Annie Sloan’s Duck Egg

Tuscan Mirror Macro

Or, here’s something that has no intricate details at all, but still turned out pretty awesome…

Large Mirror

Unfortunately, I don’t have a true “BEFORE” picture – this is the mirror painted in Annie Sloan’s Paris Grey.

Reclaimed Bookshelf copy

AFTER: hand-distressed, dry-brushed with Old White, and dark waxed.

Large Mirror Macro

What do you think – do you have a mirror needing a bit of an update? If so, I’d love to see before and after pictures!

Linked to:

Furniture Feature Fridays

DIY THURSDAY: CHECKERS ANYONE?

Happy Thursday my dear friends! I just finished a fun little something this afternoon that I’m anxious to show off…

Checker Table Unfinished

(Don’t worry – this is the before picture!)

I picked up this table months ago and as I tend to do, left it neglected in a far corner of the house until I felt the creative motivation to actually do something with it. I finally felt the motivation yesterday, and with a very vague idea in mind, went to work.

It’s difficult to tell the exact size of the table from the picture above, but it’s actually quite odd – too small to be an end table and too big and bulky to be a plant stand or miscellaneous corner table….what in the world was I to do with it?

The line detail on the top of the table gave me the idea to transform this awkward little thing into a checker board table. Without a color scheme in mind, I started off by painting the entire piece in white – my go-to color when I’m at a loss and without a strategy. I suppose it just gives me that blank canvas I need to get the creative juices (hopefully) flowing!

Once the piece was nice and white, I measured the top, calculated the measurements so my checker board would be evenly centered (3” from each edge), and then created a 12×12 square in the center, marking each individual square at 1.5”. I then taped away using Frog Tape – my first time using this particular brand and it really does work far better than the usual blue painter’s tape. I highly recommend!

Checker Table Taped

Once the piece was taped to my liking, I decided to paint one set of squares in Annie Sloan’s “Louis Blue” while leaving the other set white, which also meant that I would have to repaint the current white border in a contrasting color…

So with a bit more taping, re-taping, and more than a few disgruntled moments, I finished painting all of the squares to my liking and created a custom light grey for the border, which I also used to paint the rest of the table.

After a bit of distressing and detailing, I’m actually happy with the finished product!

Checker Table

Checker Table 2

The perfect little game table. Now I just need to find (or make) complementing checker pieces! Any ideas?
LINKED TO:

Furniture Feature Fridays

DIY THURSDAY: PIE CRUST TABLE TO PARISIAN MASTERPIECE

I found this piece on Craigslist and immediately knew that it was something that I could have fun with. I loved the style, and it was small and light enough to drag around the house and fit it into any available nook and cranny.

Pie Crust Table Before 3

(This was the picture from Craigslist)

As soon as I had it in my hands, I knew exactly what I wanted to do with it. A few weeks prior, I had ordered a stencil from Etsy and discovered it to be a perfect fit for this tabletop. (*On a side note, Etsy is an excellent source for stencils and other artistic materials. The stencil used on this table was purchased from Artistic Stencils. She currently has over 190 stencils in her shop!)

After a few dabs of paint and a coat of wax, I transformed the piece into this:

Pie Crust Table After

Interested in making a similar transformation? Here is what you will need:

Pie Crust Table Materials

  1. Stencil of your choice.
  2. Adhesive spray (found at any Michael’s stores) to adhere the stencil onto the table surface. (This makes life MUCH easier, trust me!)
  3. Two different colors of Annie Sloan chalk paint (I chose Annie Sloan’s Old White and Paris Grey)
  4. Paint brushes (my favorite brands are Purdy and Wooster) and a small, rounded stenciling brush.
  5. Wax. I either use Annie Sloan’s clear wax or Minwax in natural (found at your local hardware store).
  6. Either a wax brush (the large, rounded brush you see above) or a small cloth. A small cloth will also be needed to buff the wax off (which I forgot to include in the picture!).
  7. And finally, sandpaper in 180 grit. I use both a sanding block and sandpaper cut into small squares.

Start by wiping down the table to remove any dust and grime. This is a must for any piece you plan to paint! If there are any surface scratches that you don’t want showing on the final product (sometime surface scratches add a little character to a distressed piece!), then you may want to sand these areas down or fill with wood filler. Once the piece had been cleaned up to your liking, start painting with your base color, usually only 1 – 2 coats are necessary.

Now, I have been told but have not yet tested myself, that instead of using Annie Sloan’s chalk paint, you can simply dissolve 1/2 C. of Plaster of Paris in 1/2 C. of hot water, and add this to 1.5 C of a flat latex paint to create a similar medium. If you do try this, I’d be interested to hear how it went!

When the base color is fully dry, begin painting the top of the table in your second color of choice – only one coat is necessary. Once this is dry, you can begin distressing the piece using your 180-grit sandpaper. Typically, I use the block for flat surfaces and general edges, and the paper for the small nooks. To get a more distressed look (rather than that scratched look) make sure you press hard! Don’t be shy. Get the entire piece distressed to your liking, and then quickly dust off with a dry cloth. Your piece should now look something like this:

Pie Crust Table 2

Now comes the stenciling! Lightly spray the backside of your stencil with the adhesive (I use Martha Stewart’s adhesive spray from Michael’s) and allow it to dry just enough so it’s sticky – it usually takes around 40 seconds. Make sure you don’t spray to much onto the stencil, and make sure it dries into a sticky substance before placing onto the table! Otherwise, the adhesive could leave behind a residue. Line up your stencil to your liking, and stick it down onto your table top. Press hard.

When stenciling, I like to use a small, rounded brush (again, you can purchase a whole set of these brushes for under $7 at Michael’s).  And instead of using brush stokes, I lightly dab. That way, paint doesn’t get stuck into the crevices and/or seep under the stencil to create a huge mess! So, with the color of your choice (I used my original Old White base coat color), get to work!

After painting over all areas of your stencil, you do not need to wait for the paint to dry before removing the stencil. Carefully remove the stencil, trying not to smear any of the paint. Then allow your paint to fully try.

When all the paint has dried, lightly distress your newly painted stencil, again using the 180-grit sandpaper. A this point, your table top should look something like this:

Pie Crust Table Macro

Dust off and begin waxing. For the wax, I like to use the Annie Sloan waxing brush, but you can easily use any old cloth. Just lightly dab the brush or cloth into the wax – you don’t need a lot of it! – and begin applying to the piece using circular motions. Work in small sections, brushing on, and wiping off with a clean cloth (if you’ve seen the original Karate Kid, it’s just like that! Wax on, wax off, wax on, wax off…). When “wiping off” what you’re actually doing is buffing up the wax into a nice sheen. You’ll see the difference when you’re done! After the entire piece has been waxed (on and off), allow the wax to cure for at least 48 hours.

Finally, pat yourself on the back for creating your own masterpiece! Congrats!

Pie Crust Table

 

Featured parties I have linked to:

 Miss Mustard Seed's Creative Blog

The Shabby Nest

Katie's Nesting Spot

shabby creek cottage